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Arkansas computer program addresses rice seeding rates


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Subject matter specialists for the RICESEED computer program are Chuck Wilson, Extension agronomist, rice, and Stewart Runsick, area agronomist, rice. The program includes information for both drill-seeded rice, above, and water-seeded rice, below.

A computer program called RICESEED calculates the recommended seeding rates for rice under varying conditions. The RICESEED program generates the recommended seeding rate for rice varieties based on research conducted on the effects of various factors, including soil texture, seeding date, seeding method and seedbed condition.

The program also gives seeding rate recommendations for water seeding based on the use of pre-germinated seed (soak 24 to 36 hours and drain 24 to 36 hours before planting).

Seeding rates for water-seeded rice are increased 30 percent over conventional drill-seeded rice due to several factors that may influence stand establishment.

Water-seeded rice is more susceptible to stand reduction from seedling drift, the rice midge and blackbirds compared to dry-seeded rice. Soil type has less of an effect on stand establishment in a water-seeded system and is, therefore, disregarded in the calculation of optimum seeding rate.

Seedbed preparation is very important since seedling drift can be a major problem with conventional tillage. A good seedbed is defined as one that has been grooved or heavy clay that is rough and cloddy. The groover (implement) packs the soil while making indentations in which the seed will settle, thus reducing potential for seedling drift.

Increase the seeding rate 20 percent if the final seedbed has been prepared with an implement such as a field cultivator. The soil surface may become smooth after flooding a loose seedbed, especially on silt loam and sandy soils.

  The last factor to consider is seeding date. Seeding date primarily influences the rate of seedling development and stand establishment. Seeding rates should be increased 10 percent for early or late planting. Contact your county Extension agent for additional information.

Download the computer program at www.aragriculture.org. For rice producers who don’t have Internet access, the program can be run in the county Extension office after the relevant information has been provided.

Information for this article was provided by the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture.

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