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Ghosts, inspiration and the ‘a-ha’ moment

By Carroll Smith
Editor
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People accomplish great things everyday. Sometimes it’s a personal goal that they have been trying to reach in their private lives; other times it’s a goal that will benefit others. The interesting thing lies in the different ways in which they are motivated. Let’s start with what some folks would consider the bizarre.

I read a book review recently in which the author of a Civil War novel claims that his great-great grandfather guided him in writing this tale. While transcribing about 150 of his relative’s letters, he said he and his wife would often hear footsteps going across the computer room floor above their living room where they were sitting in the evening. The house had been built about five years after the Civil War.

Other relatives who visited reported seeing someone walk by the bedroom dressed in a long coat. They thought it was the author, but no one was at home at the time. Then, he felt his strongest connection with his great-great grandfather came in a dream he had about his ancestors.

You may be skeptical about all of these strange claims, but he eventually completed the book, and all became quiet once again.

Other people have found inspiration in relatives who are still living or mentors. This usually comes in the form of encouragement. Whether it’s completing an education or going after a better job when it seems that accomplishing this goal is against all odds. Once it actually happens, the resulting self-satisfaction and pride is worth what it took to reach that point in your life.

In this issue of Rice Farming, several articles and columns address the topic of weed resistance, which has frustrated, and sometimes baffled, those in the agricultural sector. But instead of rolling over and giving up, everyone has pulled together to find a way to overcome it. Researchers, Extension, consultants, industry personnel and even individual farmers have experimented with different strategies to fit a myriad of weed spectrum scenarios.

As a result, many have ultimately reached the “a-ha” moment when they look across the field or research plot and realize they’ve found a plan that works. Whatever means it takes to reach a successful end, the resiliency of human nature proves that anything can be accomplished if you set your mind to it.

Send your comments to: Editor, Rice Farming Magazine, 5118 Park Ave., Suite 111, Memphis, Tenn., 38117. Call (901) 767-4020 or e-mail csmith@onegrower.com.

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