Cotton Farming Peanut Grower Rice Farming CornSouth Soybean South  
spacer
topgraphic
HOME ARCHIVE ABOUT US CALENDAR LINKS SUBSCRIBE ADVERTISE CLASSIFIEDS
In This Issue
The Iron Factor
Program Designed To Reduce Drift
Focus On Waterbirds & Raptors
The Label Is The Law
Variety/Hybrid 2012 Roster
May You Plant In Interesting Times
Additional Weeds Targeted
From the Editor
Rice Producers Forum
USA Rice Federation
Specialists Speaking
Industry News
ARCHIVES

Focus On Waterbirds & Raptors

Significant step taken towards developing a Ricelands Conservation Program in California


print email

The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently approved a special $2.68 million pilot conservation program that is ideally suited for California ricelands. It is called the Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative. The California Rice Commission (CRC), in collaboration with its conservation partners, will use these funds to demonstrate how conservation funding can be wisely invested in ricelands to further enhance habitat.

This is a significant next step towards the CRC’s goal of delivering an industry-wide program in the near future. This pilot will take the California rice industry from its current work with Audubon and PRBO Conservation Science to test out the practices on a half-dozen farms to developing and refining a program that can deliver funds through NRCS contracts with participants.

This initial small-scale pilot program will be ground-tested in the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District beginning in 2011-12. Initially, the program will focus on about six specific practices beneficial to waterbirds and raptors, including:

• Returning boards back into the rice boxes after harvest to hold more rainwater.

• Enhancements of nesting habitat by modifying rice check berms and creating nesting islands.

• Enhancing duration and types of early spring habitat created when intentionally flooding rice fields in the winter season.

• Installing nesting and roost structures for certain non-waterbird species such as hawks, eagles and owls.

This pilot-scale effort, which received more than 70 applicants within the two-week sign-up period, will also include monitoring and evaluation to demonstrate proven results. The CRC will manage this pilot opportunity as a “stepping stone” towards a goal of establishing an industry-wide program available to all growers within the next few years.

This article was provided by the California Rice Commission (CRC). The CRC represents the entirety of the state’s rice industry, including all rice growers and handlers who farm and process rice.

HOTLINKS

Wildlife and rice fields:
calrice.org/Environment/Wildlife/Wildlife.htm

Rice replicates the once-abundant wetlands:
calrice.org/Environment/Environment.htm

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
email
Tell a friend:
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ad2

 

end