Invest in Money Making Inputs

Joey York – Crop Production Services Inc., Des Arc, AR

yorkI have been on and around a farm for most of my life. After graduating
from Arkansas State University, I came back to the family farm
at Little Dixie for a while, then went to work for a local retailer. During
that time, I had the opportunity to train alongside Anthony Cassinelli
and Stewart Runsick and, in 2008, joined Crop Production Services
as a consultant.

2013 was a rough, wet start for us around here. Farmers were kept
out of the field, three, sometimes four days, every week. We put the
rice in any way we could between the rains. However, normal to average
temperatures throughout the growing season did lead to good
yields and grain quality, and the earlier planted rice did even better.
Roy J, Jupiter and the hybrids had another great year.

Weed pressure in 2013 was a little heavier than usual with all the
rain, but the moisture helped the residual herbicides work really well.
We like to lay down two different residuals after the levees are up and
seeded, then come back and overlap another residual with our next
herbicide application.

As for disease, panicle blight and blast were down. Sheath blight
was up slightly due to the cooler temperatures and more rainfall. A
few stink bugs blew up in the early rice, and we treated some fields.
However, the pressure just wasn’t there going forward in my area. In
fact, last season less insect and disease pressure saved us a little
money and resulted in better grain quality.

One thing that stands out in my mind about 2013 was that the early
planted rice did so much better yieldwise, which is typical, and the
early planted rice that received a seed treatment seemed to really
shine on. Every year I am more convinced about the benefits of applying
seed treatments. The rice comes up healthier, has a hardy stand
and is more uniform. Treated rice seems to be able to endure some of
the cooler, wet weather while we are trying to establish a stand. You
have to start out with healthy, uniform rice if you expect big things in
the fall.

Going into 2014, I urge farmers to continue to plant early –
towards the end of March; use seed treatments; apply fungicides
when necessary to protect your investment; stay with a strong fertility
program, including pulling soil samples; and follow recommendations
on soil test levels. Don’t short your rice on potash, which promotes
stalk integrity and helps the crop fight off disease. With the recent
changes to the Farm Bill, don’t hamstring yourself by cutting corners
on inputs that will make you money.

To be successful, you have to put yourself in a position to succeed
and not skimp on inputs. We can’t control the weather or the markets,
but we can eliminate a few variables that will help tilt the scales in our
favor. Ultimately, the rest is up to the good Lord.

RECAP: Invest in Money Making Inputs

  1. 2013 was a rough, wet start for us. However, normal to average
    temperatures throughout the growing season did lead to good
    yields and grain quality, and the earlier planted rice did even
    better. Roy J, Jupiter and the hybrids had another great year.
  2. We like to lay down two different residuals after the levees are
    up and seeded, then come back and overlap another residual
    with our next herbicide application.
  3. As for disease, panicle blight and blast were down. Sheath
    blight was up slightly due to the cooler temperatures and
    more rainfall. A few stink bugs blew up in the early rice, and we
    treated some fields. However, the pressure just wasn’t there
    going forward in my area.
  4. Every year I am more convinced about the benefits of applying
    seed treatments. The rice comes up healthier, has a hardy stand
    and is more uniform.
  5. I urge farmers to continue to plant early, use seed treatments,
    apply fungicides when necessary, stay with a strong fertility
    program and follow recommendations on soil test levels. Don’t
    short your rice on potash, which promotes stalk integrity and
    helps the crop fight off disease.

More about Joey York

  • B.S. degree in Agriculture Business – Arkansas State
    University, 1993
  • Has consulted for six years on rice, corn, soybeans, milo
    and a little wheat
  • Certified Crop Adviser – a program of the American Society
    of Agronomy
  • Married to wife, Karen. Two children: Ty, 13;
    and Sadie, 10
  • Enjoys spending time with family and serving in the
    First Baptist Church, located in Des Arc
  • Likes to hunt and fish when time allows