Tag Archives: insect pests

EPA grants Section 18 to control armyworms in California rice

large armyworms in california rice

The Environmental Protection Agency has approved a Section 18 emergency exemption for Intrepid 2F Insecticide for use in Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Merced, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Sutter, Yolo and Yuba counties, California. You need to make certain Intrepid 2F Insecticide is on your rice pesticide (restricted materials) permit at the county agricultural commissioner’s office. The various pesticide database companies will receive ... Read More »

Keep an eye on armyworms in fields adjacent to California rice

yellowstriped armyworm

• By Luis Espino • The first set of traps were set up on April 19, and more traps are being set up as fields get ready for planting. So far, seven sites have been set up. As you know, there are two species of armyworms that are found in rice, the true armyworm and the western yellowstriped armyworm. Surprisingly, ... Read More »

Armyworms are on the march in California

• By Luis Espino, UC Rice Farming Systems Adviser, Butte and Glenn counties • The California armyworm monitoring season has started. The first traps were set April 19, and two more sites were set up on April 30. More traps will be set up in the following weeks as growers finish their ground work and get ready for planting. Interestingly, ... Read More »

After Louisiana’s warm winter, watch out for more insect pests

planthopper nymphs

• By Blake Wilson and Sebe Brown • Populations of pest insects are often influenced by factors at play well before crops are planted. Winter mortality is a key regulator of spring insect populations, particularly for pests introduced from tropical regions. The 2018-2019 winter was mild, especially in the southern half of the state, where temperatures didn’t dip below a ... Read More »

A pleasant surprise

california lodged rice

The Arkansas rice planting season in 2017 went at a near-record pace, lagging behind only 2012. Planted acres were expected to be 25 percent less than in 2016. The positive early season conditions had growers feeling upbeat about the year to come. Read More »