Herbicide Program Must Fit The Farm

Rice Farming April 2015_Page_07_Image_0001

James Bowen Bowen Rice Consulting Inc. Boyle, Miss.

At the age of 15 while I was in high school, I helped my daddy water rice for different farmers in the Benoit area. By the time I graduated, I knew I wanted to do something related to rice. I received a degree in agronomy from Mississippi State, then went to work for Bill Killen, a local rice consultant. That’s when I really fell in love with rice. I started my own business, Bowen Rice Consulting Inc. in 1999.

Last year, in spite of having another wet spring, 2014 was a really good year yield-wise. My philosophy is to take one year at a time. I have learned that even if the season starts off slow, that doesn’t mean it’s going to be a bad year.

As far as troublesome weeds in rice, barnyardgrass and sprangletop are top of the list in our area, followed by pigweed. We also are seeing more dayflower and glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass. When I put together a herbicide program for my farmers, I do it on a farm-by-farm basis, depending on the weed spectrum. I typically start off with a tankmix of glyphosate, Command and Sharpen right behind the roller. Then, I wait to see what weeds emerge after that treatment. If Command breaks, I will come back right before flood with Clincher/Facet, Stam/Facet or Regiment/Facet, depending on the weeds we are targeting in a particular field.

Pigweed And Dayflower Becoming More Prominent

RebelEX by Dow AgroSciencesThese days, we are having a lot of trouble with pigweed in beans. Normally, the pigweed escapes that we have in beans will show up in rice the following year. In the past, pigweed has not been a really troublesome weed in rice, but now we are seeing more and more of it. In the Clearfield system, I like to apply Grasp Xtra because it’s a mix of Grasp and Grandstand. I put it out just ahead of the flood, and it does a really good job on pigweed.

Where we are seeing dayflower, I apply a tankmix of Regiment and Facet just ahead of the flood. If glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass is in the field, it’s best to get something out early – end of January, first of February. I typically go with a mix of Roundup, Select and Sharpen or 2,4-D. Roundup gets rid of winter annuals like poa annua, Select helps with the glyphosate-resistant ryegrass, and Sharpen or 2,4-D takes care of henbit and/or horseweed. However, keep in mind that Select, as well as 2,4-D, has a 30-day plant-back restriction. If you miss that timing, then the next option is to go with Gramoxone if it’s close to planting.

Grasp Xtra Herbicide from Dow AgroSciencesAs we get into the 2015 season, rice farmers need to make sure they are using an effective herbicide program that fits the farm. This approach will save money in the long run. Farmers also should plant early, if possible, to have the best chance of making optimum yields.

Recap: Herbicide Program Must Fit The Farm

1. As far as troublesome weeds in rice, barnyardgrass and sprangletop are top of the list in our area, followed by pigweed. We also are seeing more dayflower and glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass.

2. I typically start off with a tankmix of glyphosate, Command and Sharpen right behind the roller.

3. If Command breaks, I will come back right before flood with Clincher/Facet, Stam/Facet or Regiment/Facet, depending on the weeds we are targeting in a particular field.

4. In the Clearfield system, I like to apply Grasp Xtra because it’s a mix of Grasp and Grandstand. I put it out just ahead of the flood, and it does a really good job on pigweed.

5. Where we are seeing dayflower, I apply a tankmix of Regiment and Facet just ahead of the flood.

6. If glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass is in the field, I typically go out early with a mix of Roundup, Select and Sharpen or 2,4-D. Roundup gets rid of the winter annuals like poa annua, Select helps with glyphosate-resistant ryegrass, and Sharpen or 2,4-D takes care of henbit and/or horseweed.