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Honing a craft

toasted and malted rice

Retired California rice researcher Jim Eckert refines rice malting for gluten-free brewing and distilling. By Vicky Boyd,  Editor — To describe Chico, California-based Eckert Malting and Brewing Co. as a labor of love is an understatement. What started as Jim Eckert trying to home-brew beer for his wife, who had become gluten intolerant, has evolved into a commercial-scale gluten-free rice ... Read More »

Weed Control Is Key In Missouri Rice

David (left) and Wes Howard

• SPONSORED CONTENT • My brother, Wes, and I grew up on a cotton and soybean farm in the Bootheel of Missouri. I worked for a consultant after my dad quit farming in 1999, and Wes did custom spraying for eight years. In 2008, I started Heartland Crop Consultants, and Wes and I became partners in the business in 2011. ... Read More »

Research Focus: Rice Weed Management

• SPONSORED CONTENT • I began working in the ag chemistry industry right out of graduate school. My work in rice began in the mid-1980s helping to develop the rice herbicides Whip 1 EC and Whip 360. After 30 years with Bayer CropScience, in 2009, I was offered a position with the Tremont and Lyman Groups where I am the ... Read More »

Beer made with rice wins gluten-free brewing contest

Dad's Red Ale

— By Jennifer L. Blanck — The winner of the inaugural PNW (Pacific Northwest) Gluten-Free Homebrewing Competition is a beer made with rice. Dad’s Red Ale, an American Amber Ale brewed by Joe Morris from Portland, Oregon, won the competition. Morris used James’ Brown Rice, Crystal Rice and Biscuit Rice malts from Eckert Malting and Brewing Co. in Chico, California, to ... Read More »

Be careful out there

paraquat applied to CL163 at 50 percent heading

Rice remains sensitive to soybean harvest-aid drift late into the season, according to MSU research. By Vicky Boyd, Editor — For the past few seasons, Mississippi State University Extension Rice Agronomist Bobby Golden and MSU graduate student Justin McCoy have received phone calls from growers asking them to come out and examine fields affected by suspected herbicide drift. But it ... Read More »

Keep eyes peeled for armyworms and planthoppers

kids at the InsectExpo 2018

Here in Texas, we’re off to a cold, rather wet spring, which creates a challenge for stand establishment. I hope the weather warms soon. This month, I want to talk about mid-season insect pest control for Texas rice farmers. If you did not treat your seed with an insecticide to control rice water weevil, I suggest you apply a labeled ... Read More »

Dustin Harrell answers common N management questions

fertilizer

Nitrogen is one of the largest expenses in a rice production budget. Efficient use of fertilizer N not only helps maximize grain yield, but it also helps lower fertilization rates, lower fertilizer expenses and minimize negative effects on the environment. There are a handful of questions that I get asked annually regarding N fertilization, and I thought I would take ... Read More »

Single pre-flood N application sets plant up for high yields

Due to a long dry fall, Missouri growers have leveled and prepared their fields and are ready to plant. Recent rains have saturated our soils, so early seeding has been delayed, which is OK because we still have time to plant our estimated 200,000 acres. Early insects and diseases reduce yield and quality and increase production cost, which lowers profit. ... Read More »

International markets will keep us busy this summer

export shipments

I want to assure you that even though this column is going on hiatus for the summer, our work continues unabated. We will spend the summer as we do every season — finding and opening new markets, expanding opportunities in existing markets, and fighting threats to the U.S. industry here and abroad. Read More »

Good straw residue management tops stem rot control options

Winter flooded California rice fields

In the past few years, the number of calls I have received about disease management has increased considerably. Most of them were about stem rot, a disease that seems prevalent in many areas of the Sacramento Valley. Stem rot is a fungal disease. In the fall, the fungus forms resting structures called sclerotia inside infected tillers. These sclerotia survive in ... Read More »