Tag Archives: Disease Control

Start Strong To Finish Strong

ROBB DEDMANPRO AG CONSULTING, INC. RISON, ARK. In 1990, I worked as a rice scout for Dr. Nathan Slaton, who, at the time, was a county agent with the Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service. After graduating from college, I went to work in retail, but I always wanted to be a consultant. In 2002, I had the opportunity to become a ... Read More »

Thinking outside the box

BY CARROLL SMITH EDITOR The origin of the phrase “thinking outside the box” is typically attributed to the Nine Dots Puzzle, pictured below. Three rows of three dots are inside a box. The challenge is to connect the dots with four straight lines without picking up your pencil. As it turns out, the solution to the puzzle involves going outside ... Read More »

Unleash Pivot Power

Missouri farmer finds a new way to bring rice into the rotation BY CARROLL SMITH EDITOR Dennis Robison, who farms in the Missouri Bootheel, is typically in a 50/50 rotation between rice and soybeans on 2,600 acres. For the most part, this rotation works well for him with the exception of a 45-acre field that has sandy, loamy soil in ... Read More »

Smallflower Umbrella Sedge on zero-grade

SAM ATWELL MISSOURI Agronomy Specialist atwells@missouri.edu At our annual Missouri Rice Producers Conference in February, we had topics on resistant weeds, rice weed control recommendations for flood, furrow and pivot rice. Fertilizer recommendations, soil testing and the economic application of nitrogen and other fertilizers to rice were presented. Variety selection, special rice, insects, diseases, marketing, water issues, the aquifer and ... Read More »

Sustainable Agriculture

U.S. rice industry committed to taking proactive stance By Carroll Smith Editor Almost three years ago, buyers in the rice industry were getting requests from end users about sustainability and U.S. rice farming sustainability practices. Today, sustainable agriculture has become a buzzword, especially with consumers. To define what sustainability means for U.S. rice production and ensure a long-term and viable ... Read More »

NBLS gains importance in Texas

DR. M.O. “MO” WAY TEXAS Rice Research Entomologist moway@aesrg.tamu.edu Remember the “disease triangle” when thinking about rice disease management. The three points of the triangle are the disease-causing pathogen, the host and the environment. All three interact to determine the incidence and severity of the disease. My first plant pathology course at UC Davis was held in a huge lecture ... Read More »

Texas Ratoon Crop: 5 Tips For Success

Attention to detail bumps up second crop potential Several factors are critical to successful ratoon crop production. The earlier the ratoon crop matures, the higher its potential yield. Therefore, rapid stimulation of regrowth is an important factor. Apply the planned preflood nitrogen rate immediately after harvesting the main crop and flood it into the soil to stimulate regrowth. Keep soils ... Read More »

A little lagniappe

By Carroll Smith Editor Lagniappe (lan-yap) is a Louisiana French term that means “something extra” and often unexpected – in a good way. While assembling this issue of Rice Farming, I realized that I had been the recipient of lagniappe this month and wanted to share it with our readers. The first instance appears in the cover story on pages ... Read More »

From dry planting to water-seeding.

Dr. John Saichuk Louisiana jsaichuk@agcenter.lsu.edu Last year I wrote an article on water management on March 29. Following is most of the first paragraph of that article. I had no idea at the time of how much of it would be accurate and how different it would be this year. “While I have not had any calls about salt water ... Read More »

Variety Highlights

Arkansas rice experts collect and share reliable data Editor’s note: To view the Rice Information Sheet No. 170 in its entirety, including all of the tables, go to www.uaex.edu and search for Arkansas Rice Performance Trials, 2009-2011 or contact your local University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension office. Choosing a variety is generally based upon past experience, seed availability, agronomic traits ... Read More »